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Wat Khositaram
Bang Khut Sankhaburi Chai Nat 17140
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Description
Wat Rakhang Khositaram is located on Arun Arnarin Road, Sirirat Sub-district, Bangkok Noi District, and Bangkok. Take bus no. 19. 57 or ferries to the Tha Rot Fai Pier, Wang Lang Pier or hop off at the Tha Chang Pier then take a ferry to cross the river to the Wat Rakhang Pier. Wat Rakhang Khositaram, formerly known as Wat Bang Wa Yai, is an Ayutthaya period temple. During the Thon Buri period, the temple was reconstructed and upgraded as a royal temple by King Taksin the Great who ordered the construction of a palace in the area. The temple then became the residence of the Supreme Patriarch. Later in the reign of King Rama I the Great, a bell was discovered at Wat Bang Wa Yai. This bell was moved to Wat Phra Kaeo and five replacement bells were then built. The temple was named “Wat Rakhang Khositaram or Temple of the Bells” because of this discovery. Wat Rakhang Khositaram was a residence of Somdet Phra Phutthachan (To Phromrangsi) who was the Supreme Patriarch in the reign of King Rama IV. He was very highly respected and had a comprehensive knowledge of Pali and Buddhist teachings as can be seen in his composition of the Phra Khatha Chinabanchon (Jinapanjara) liturgy widely chanted among Thai Buddhists. There is a belief that worshiping at Wat Rakhang will result in the worshipers becoming popular and have an ever-growing reputation just like the far-reaching sound of ringing bells. The true concept behind this is that one should concentrate on learning and practice in order to earn fame and to achieve sustainable success. Unlike the sound of ringing bells that will gradually die away, the knowledge and the virtue will prevail. The Tripitaka Tower or the scripture depository that houses the sacred Tripitaka scriptures is a lavishly decorated building that was once used as a residence and an ordination hall of King Rama I the Great while he was holding his official post in the Than Buri period. The external walls of the building are painted red. Inside the wall are murals by the artist Achan Nak depicting the daily life of people in the period. The carved door panels of the building are beautifully decorated with gilded black lacquer. The Ubosot or the main hall also houses the presiding Buddha image referred to by King Rama V the Great as “Phra Prathan Yim Rap Fa Wat Rakhang Kositaram Woramahawihan known as Temple of the Bells or Wat LuangPhorToh is located at 250, Siriratch sub-district, Bangkok Noi district in Bangkok. The temple is a royal temple of the second grade of Woramahawiharn in Thai sect of Theravada Buddhism district 1. Its original name was Wat Bangwa Yai (or Bangwa Yai) which was built in the Ayutthaya Period. During Thonburi period, King Taksin the Great had constructed the palace near Wat Bangwa Yai, he then had the temple renovated and designated the place to be a royal temple for the residence of SomdetPhraSangkharat, the first Supreme Patriarch of the Buddhist priests during Rattanakosin period. The king then graciously ordered the transfer of Phra Tripitaka (Buddhist scriptures) from Nakhon Si Thammarat province to be revised.
In the reign of King Rama I, Wat Bangwa Yai was patronized by Her Royal Highness Princess Chao FaKromPhrayaThepSudawadi (Sa), the eldest sister of King Rama I and the mother of KromPhrarajawangBowornSathanPhimuk. Her residence was located next to the temple. She then supported King Rama I in renovating the temple. Later, an ancient bell was found at the temple and the King had the bell moved to the Temple of the Emerald Buddha and built five new bells to donate to the temple. Thence the temple was renamed“Wat Rakhang Kositaram”
There is an old Tripitaka Hall situated in the temple area. It was the original residence of King Rama I when he was in the service during Thonburi period. There is also Phra Ubosot with Three tiers roof, the symbolic Rattanakosin style, including gable apex, tooth-like ridges on the sloping edges of a gable, hanghong and delicately decorated brackets. Inside, the principal Buddha image of Wat Rakang was situated called PhraPrathanYim Rub Fa; it is a bronze Buddha statue in the attitude of meditation with approximately 4 cubits wide. In front of the Buddha image, 3 monk statues are situated.
History
Wat Rakhang Khositaram is located on Arun Arnarin Road, Sirirat Sub-district, Bangkok Noi District, and Bangkok. Take bus no. 19. 57 or ferries to the Tha Rot Fai Pier, Wang Lang Pier or hop off at the Tha Chang Pier then take a ferry to cross the river to the Wat Rakhang Pier. Wat Rakhang Khositaram, formerly known as Wat Bang Wa Yai, is an Ayutthaya period temple. During the Thon Buri period, the temple was reconstructed and upgraded as a royal temple by King Taksin the Great who ordered the construction of a palace in the area. The temple then became the residence of the Supreme Patriarch. Later in the reign of King Rama I the Great, a bell was discovered at Wat Bang Wa Yai. This bell was moved to Wat Phra Kaeo and five replacement bells were then built. The temple was named “Wat Rakhang Khositaram or Temple of the Bells” because of this discovery. Wat Rakhang Khositaram was a residence of Somdet Phra Phutthachan (To Phromrangsi) who was the Supreme Patriarch in the reign of King Rama IV. He was very highly respected and had a comprehensive knowledge of Pali and Buddhist teachings as can be seen in his composition of the Phra Khatha Chinabanchon (Jinapanjara) liturgy widely chanted among Thai Buddhists. There is a belief that worshiping at Wat Rakhang will result in the worshipers becoming popular and have an ever-growing reputation just like the far-reaching sound of ringing bells. The true concept behind this is that one should concentrate on learning and practice in order to earn fame and to achieve sustainable success. Unlike the sound of ringing bells that will gradually die away, the knowledge and the virtue will prevail. The Tripitaka Tower or the scripture depository that houses the sacred Tripitaka scriptures is a lavishly decorated building that was once used as a residence and an ordination hall of King Rama I the Great while he was holding his official post in the Than Buri period. The external walls of the building are painted red. Inside the wall are murals by the artist Achan Nak depicting the daily life of people in the period. The carved door panels of the building are beautifully decorated with gilded black lacquer. The Ubosot or the main hall also houses the presiding Buddha image referred to by King Rama V the Great as “Phra Prathan Yim Rap Fa Wat Rakhang Kositaram Woramahawihan known as Temple of the Bells or Wat LuangPhorToh is located at 250, Siriratch sub-district, Bangkok Noi district in Bangkok. The temple is a royal temple of the second grade of Woramahawiharn in Thai sect of Theravada Buddhism district 1. Its original name was Wat Bangwa Yai (or Bangwa Yai) which was built in the Ayutthaya Period. During Thonburi period, King Taksin the Great had constructed the palace near Wat Bangwa Yai, he then had the temple renovated and designated the place to be a royal temple for the residence of SomdetPhraSangkharat, the first Supreme Patriarch of the Buddhist priests during Rattanakosin period. The king then graciously ordered the transfer of Phra Tripitaka (Buddhist scriptures) from Nakhon Si Thammarat province to be revised.
In the reign of King Rama I, Wat Bangwa Yai was patronized by Her Royal Highness Princess Chao FaKromPhrayaThepSudawadi (Sa), the eldest sister of King Rama I and the mother of KromPhrarajawangBowornSathanPhimuk. Her residence was located next to the temple. She then supported King Rama I in renovating the temple. Later, an ancient bell was found at the temple and the King had the bell moved to the Temple of the Emerald Buddha and built five new bells to donate to the temple. Thence the temple was renamed“Wat Rakhang Kositaram”
There is an old Tripitaka Hall situated in the temple area. It was the original residence of King Rama I when he was in the service during Thonburi period. There is also Phra Ubosot with Three tiers roof, the symbolic Rattanakosin style, including gable apex, tooth-like ridges on the sloping edges of a gable, hanghong and delicately decorated brackets. Inside, the principal Buddha image of Wat Rakang was situated called PhraPrathanYim Rub Fa; it is a bronze Buddha statue in the attitude of meditation with approximately 4 cubits wide. In front of the Buddha image, 3 monk statues are situated.
Information
Opening hours
Sunday
: 06:00 - 18:00
Monday
: 06:00 - 18:00
Tuesday
: 06:00 - 18:00
Wednesday
: 06:00 - 18:00
Thursday
: 06:00 - 18:00
Friday
: 06:00 - 18:00
Saturday
: 06:00 - 18:00
Remark (Opening hours) : -
Transportation
• Motorcycles
• Car
Entrance fees
• Entrance fees: Non-fee
• Remark : -
Contact us
Address
Bang Khut Sankhaburi Chai Nat 17140
Telephone No.
063-6647919
Map

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